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Fourth US Navy Collision This Year Raises Suspicion of Cyber-Attacks

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Next Web: Early Monday morning a U.S. Navy Destroyer collided with a merchant vessel off the coast of Singapore. The U.S. Navy initially reported that 10 sailors were missing, and today found “some of the remains” in flooded compartments. While Americans mourn the loss of our brave warriors, top brass is looking for answers. Monday’s crash involving the USS John McCain is the fourth in the area, and possibly the most difficult to understand. So far this year 17 U.S. sailors have died in the Pacific southeast due to seemingly accidental collisions with civilian vessels.

Should four collisions in the same geographical area be chalked up to coincidence? Could a military vessel be hacked? In essence, what if GPS spoofing or administrative lockout caused personnel to be unaware of any imminent danger or unable to respond? The Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) says there’s no reason to think it was a cyber-attack, but they’re looking into it: “2 clarify Re: possibility of cyber intrusion or sabotage, no indications right now…but review will consider all possibilities,” tweeted Adm. John Richardson. The obvious suspects — if a sovereign nation is behind any alleged attacks — would be Russia, China, and North Korea, all of whom have reasonable access to the location of all four incidents. It may be chilling to imagine such a bold risk, but it’s not outlandish to think a government might be testing cyber-attack capabilities in the field.


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